Canada geese

img_20190106_004721 I’ve seen a lot of Canada Geese on the lake this weekend. They fly to Britain to overwinter where they can rest and survive over the winter .

I think they are smart looking birds with their black, white and brown markings.

They are certainly pushy when it comes to feeding them. When I was feeding the ducks yesterday the Canada Geese grabbed a fair share of the food. They are certainly bold!

I love the way you can go for a walk and see lots of birds at the lake. We saw small birds as well, Robins, a blackbird and a couple of wrens. Not close enough to get photos, but still close enough to see them.

 

Afternoon walk

It was grey and cold, but after visiting a hobby shop for train track for my partners model railway we decided to get a warm cup of coffee then go for a walk.

The local lake (actually a canal reservoir) is around a mile in circumference and nice and flat. We picked up some duck food and strolled around in the cold..

The light was fading but the birds were still around and raced across the lake to get the food we were throwing out for them. My hands were getting progressively colder as I fed them and then took photos of their antics. The images were a bit blurry, but I also took pictures of the trees. Their empty branches and twigs reached up like fingers to the sky. I’ve taken too many photos as usual but I was able to make some interesting patterns from them. Glad to be home and warm again.

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Feathers

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I guess you can make a bit of art out of anything. This was an attempt to draw a peacock feather. I thought of how feathers have been used for centuries to make quill pens?

How many million words were created and written from ink and a feathered quill?

Then I thought about what ink is made of. I used to use something called quink ink. When you use it with water it splits from black into blue and brown colours. I would paint pictures with it. This was years ago, it may have changed now. Ink used to be made of  things like oak galls. It is interesting that before paper was used in the west vellum was the surface people wrote on. Many of the laws set down in this country’s parliament was written down with quill pens onto vellum. Other countries used ink and brushes, and I think you can see the different characteristics of the shape of letters depending on what mark making tool was used.

Feathers have been used for so many things. Pillows, duvets, feathered dusters, cushions, even burnt under peoples noses to revive them when they fainted.

It is interesting that dinosaurs sometimes had feathers and birds evolved from them, so feathers have been around for millions of years.

 

 

Kaleidoscopic

One of my favourite things to do with photographs is to put them through the google layout app that allows you to take a photo, flip it and flip it again. You end up with strange abstract patterns, of symmetry and asymmetry, depending in how many photos you use.

I treated the goose photos two different ways. The large goose has been tipped and twisted 4 ways do that there is a pattern of S shapes. The other is 4 vertical panels, all the same size. That I have called “get your geese in a row”. The third picture is of partly completed kitchen cupboards “kaliediscoped”…

The fourth picture is two photos of almost the same view. Both were flipped,  but I made sure they did not line up for a change.

The fifth us of the pilings supporting the cafe at a local lake. The cafe seems to float above the lake and these pillars help to support it. The final photo was of oriental poppies at a local pottery….there seems to be a stepped path up through the foliage.

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Last year

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Last year the garden was lovely, full of flowers. This ceramic head I made 20 years or so ago was full of nasturtiums and lobelia. It sits on the wall by the back door, its glazed in st Nicholas glaze if I remember rightly. Greeny grey in colour. It was hand built with a flat back and I used wet hand towels to support the face while it was drying out ready for firing.

The space inside it is not very big, so plants that can survive drought conditions are best planted in it.

We are getting our hanging baskets this week and I will try and plant some pots up with begonias, pelagoniums, bizzie lizzies and fuschias to cheer the walls around them up.

I would like to do some more pottery heads, maybe green men masks to make the yard more interesting.

Meanwhile in the main garden the trees are getting out of control. We had some work done earlier in the year but the remaining trees and shrubs have gone rampant because they now have more light.

Still if it works and we get more birds like a chaffinch and a couple of robins, plus nesting blue tits who’s chicks have now fledged , I guess I don’t mind too much!